All Systems Operational
Email Processing Operational
Inky Region 1 ? Operational
Inky Region 2 ? Operational
Inky Region 3 ? Operational
Inky EU ? Operational
Link Rewriting service ? Operational
Dashboard Services Operational
90 days ago
99.97 % uptime
Today
Dashboard Services US ? Operational
Dashboard Services EU Operational
90 days ago
99.97 % uptime
Today
Operational
Degraded Performance
Partial Outage
Major Outage
Maintenance
Major outage
Partial outage
No downtime recorded on this day.
No data exists for this day.
had a major outage.
had a partial outage.
Past Incidents
Jan 16, 2022
Completed - The scheduled maintenance has been completed.
Jan 16, 06:00 UTC
In progress - Scheduled maintenance is currently in progress. We will provide updates as necessary.
Jan 16, 05:00 UTC
Scheduled - Inky Operations is performing a scheduled maintenance on the configuration dashboard. During this time customers will be unable to log into the configuration dashboard to make changes to their Inky settings.

Mail processing is unaffected by this maintenance.
Jan 16, 03:35 UTC
Jan 15, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 14, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 13, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 12, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 11, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 10, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 9, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 8, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 7, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 6, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 5, 2022
Resolved - This incident has been resolved.
Jan 5, 16:22 UTC
Monitoring - Inky systems are not affected by the recently discovered log4j vulnerability. Late last week an announcement was made of a vulnerability in the ubiquitous log4j library in Java. Inky began investigation and testing for evidence of systems vulnerable to the log4j bug. We have been able to determine that none of the Java components that we utilize have exposure to the log4j vulnerability. We have updated and or disabled the log4j components on all backend systems to ensure no future changes could lead to an exposure.
Dec 15, 13:38 UTC
Resolved - This incident has been resolved.
Jan 5, 16:22 UTC
Monitoring - The log4j vulnerability means that threat actors can potentially trigger malicious code execution in customer systems running Java simply by including certain character sequences in email headers or body text. Specifically, malicious code can run when carefully crafted text in an email is logged by a Java runtime running unpatched log4j code.

Here are some examples of how an attacker’s email could lead to malicious code execution on an INKY customer’s backend system:

- The customer runs an Outlook add-in that sends emails matching certain criteria to a backend system implemented in Java, incorporating unpatched log4j, and allowing Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI). A real-world example is Salesforce, which can be fed emails in this manner.

- The customer logs or analyzes emails via a Java backend process running unpatched log4j and allowing JNDI.

- The customer has end users who read emails using a mail client implemented in Java, where the Java mail client supports JNDI and logs email contents using unpatched log4j.



New INKY detection method and banner

To limit bad actors’ ability to exploit this new vulnerability via email, INKY has deployed new detection models that can identify this threat, add a red danger banner, and direct the email to user/admin quarantine (if the customer is using INKY’s delivery settings feature).

This new detection method looks for indicative log4j exploit sequences such as a dollar sign followed by a left brace followed by the string ”jndi”. The detection code includes additional heuristics to spot attacker attempts to obfuscate these indicative sequences; for security reasons we won’t publish details of these heuristics; if you would like details, please contact us.

VERY IMPORTANT: while this new detection method identifies the vast majority of attempted log4j exploits, attackers may yet have clever methods to subvert even these checks. Customers should patch all systems that rely on log4j as soon as possible.

The log4j exploit underscores why INKY examines email prior to its delivery to the inbox, eschewing API-based post-delivery approaches: once an email is delivered to a user inbox, it can then be logged and trigger the exploit. Only an inline pre-delivery detection system like INKY can truly mitigate this kind of exploit – by preventing delivery of malicious emails to end users.



Additional recommendations and mitigating factors

INKY recommends customers audit their mail processing tools and environments to ensure that they are not vulnerable to the log4j exploit.

Note, however, that simply receiving an email with a log4j exploit sequence alone does not execute malicious code; malicious code can only be executed by a Java runtime both running unpatched log4j code and enabling JNDI.

If you have questions or concerns about whether you may be affected by the log4j vulnerability, please connect with us to schedule a discussion. We are here to help!
Dec 20, 18:34 UTC
Jan 4, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 3, 2022

No incidents reported.

Jan 2, 2022

No incidents reported.